Customer Reviews from Amazon Prime, February 2015

Amazon Vine readers have been given the opportunity to preview “Big Weed” and have given it an average of 5 out of 5 stars. All you reviewers out there, thanks for the great feedback!

The following reviews were originally published on Amazon.com.

Out of the shadows

 5.0 out of 5 stars

“Big Weed” is the story of a medical marijuana entrepreneur and the creation and growth of his company, Green Man Cannabis. The book also includes background information on marijuana and its history in the U.S.

The author had to deal with the normal difficulties of starting a business such as finding funding and competent employees as well as ones caused by the illegality of marijuana under Federal law despite its various degrees of legality in twenty-five states, such as banking and dealing with the police and societal attitudes towards the drug. There are definitely issues still to be resolved as the industry moves from the shadows into respectability.

The business eventually achieves success both business-wise and in growing marijuana that wins awards for quality. There are two retail outlets in Denver and the menus online show the different varieties and forms of marijuana on offer, including baked goods and candy.

The book is generally well-written and makes for informative and entertaining reading.

February 12, 2015


 

Enjoyable Book That Teaches You A Little Something About Buisness To Boot

5.0 out of 5 stars 

“Big Weed: An Entrepreneur’s High-Stakes Adventures in the Budding Legal Marijuana Business” by Christian Hageseth has to be the most entertaining business book written EVER. With pot finally being accepted more and more in main stream society with your local dealers and illegal pot trade losing traction, we need to look at the legalized business of Marijuana.

It reads more like an entertaining memoir than your usual business book but, that’s the nature of the business and the main product it brings to the market. This is a book I had a hard time putting down and finished in an afternoon. I’ve never had so much fun learning.

February 12, 2015


 

Enjoyable Reading

5.0 out of 5 stars

I enjoyed reading this book, for its insight into the author’s journey throughout the evolving environment as a ganjapreneur.

No stranger to smoke, but having been in realty, the author shares his story from his first day on the golf course, where the idea was presented to him, and on through his struggles with federal law interfering with maintaining relationships with banks, his straightforward approach to maintain integrity and honesty during the growth of his business, and the challenges he faced alnong the way.

The book offers insight into the industry, from its infancy, to its vertically structured modifications as laws changed, yet it reads like a story, with interesting stories from the people the author has met throughout his journey, including a struggling young Mexican’s long walking trek to care for his family, and the dangers associated with his means to get by in life, and also an opportunity to dine with one of the most revered resources and accomplished growing authors in marijuana, Ed Rosenthal.

This is an interesting read, and an exceptionally written book that is suitable for anyone with entrepreneurial ambitions, or anyone that may enjoy learning about the birth of a cannabis dispensary.

February 12, 2015


 

Reads like a novel

5.0 out of 5 stars

This is an entertaining book to read straight through. The author has a white collar background and now runs a small chain of marijuana dispensaries in Denver, Green Man Cannabis, which he’s run since 2009 at first as a medicinal seller. In 2014, Colorado legalized marijuana and he was caught up in excitement about a whole new market and opportunity to build a business. This is his story of trying to be first and get established.

The book is very well written. It reads like a novel and pulled me in. The story covers the big market but also covers colorful characters he meets along the way. Many growers are still small farm or individual, even hobbyists. A look at Green Man Weed’s website will show, he’s selling artisan weed in dozens of varieties with funny names. Like a pub that sells local brews can compete with Natty Lite, this is his view of the small business weed store of the future.

February 11, 2015


 

Overview of the past, current and future of Big Weed

3.0 out of 5 stars

There are lots of questions and even more people trying to answer them. There are a handful of books on the market currently, (and many more to come in the following months) that try to answer those questions.

Overall this book is an interesting read for those wanting to learn more. It give a brief overview of the former market, the current market and what may be the future market for all players big and small.

February 11, 2015


 

Entertaining and Educational

 5.0 out of 5 stars

“Big Weed” is an enjoyable and educational book Hageseth is a marijuana enthusiast as well as a savvy businessman. In this book he presents his journey of creating a marijuana farm based on his knowledge of how our markets work. His background is in real estate but when that market crashed he needed to find another venture. He discusses how his wife (now ex-wife) felt ambivalent about both his choice of the new Colorado laws surrounding this drug and his choice to continue as an entrepreneur rather than becoming an employee at an established firm. He also writes about how he presented his work to his three young kids. It was fun to trace his travails and sometimes his bumbling in this newly legal field.

Hageseth’s writing is clear and entertaining while still doling out his hard won wisdom of how businesses works. He found himself floundering at times because this is such a new field. After educating himself he also had to navigate the prejudices and just plain ignorance of the mainstream business world, law enforcement, and medical workers. If you’ve ever dreamed of striking out on your own “Big Weed” can serve in part as a `how to’ business manual or if you’ve wondered about the types of marijuana and how they affect the body and mind you’ll find it here. “Big Weed” is also entertaining.

February 11, 2015


 

Great book for a budding business

5.0 out of 5 stars 

I have to admit I was surprised at what an easy read this book was! Some business books have very good information but it is told in a very boring and drawn out way. Not so with this book! Whatever your view is of the legalization of marijuana is this is a great read with lots of interesting information!

 February 10, 2015


 

An interesting read about the legal and entrepreneur pot business

4.0 out of 5 stars 

Living in Washington and in the midst of policy review of state and local ordinances of the recently legalized recreational marijuana businesses, this book was an interesting read. Much of Hageseth’s points are true: Pot is the wild west of business. There is a lot of uncharted territory, a lot of “not in my backyard” and a ton of potential money to be made – both at the supply and retail sides. There are lots of issues – some banks won’t deal with money because it’s not federally legal; security measures need to be in place; figuring out how to meet all the requirements of the laws that vary greatly from city to city (or county)…it’s an interesting read and Hageseth seems to have figured out a sweet spot for the time being. While a certain segment of the book is devoted to Hageseth and his ego, it’s not enough to detract from some of the central points about being at the right time and right place and willing to put one’s neck out to attempt a new business.

February 9, 2015

 

 


 

Pot Luck

4.0 out of 5 stars 

When marijuana was legalized, the author navigated some uncharted waters. With a mishmash of contradictory laws and interests, he applied his entrepreneurial know how to a new and profitable industry. Of course the sweet smell of money attracts the giant corporate interests and anything with political overtones is bound to be problematic. Still, the author had a vision and provides an interesting account of the birth of a business and predictions for the future.

Entertaining, informative and engaging, this is an easy read. It does not seem fair that the well funded interests are already shutting out the small artisanal grower. This book provides perspective of the challenges and rewards. In short, it’s smokin’.

February 9, 2015

 

 


 

Greener pastures bringing in the green

4.0 out of 5 stars 

Having been intrigued by the MSNBC original series, Pot Barons of Colorado, I was eager to read Big Weed: An Entrepreneur’s High-Stakes Adventures in the Budding Legal Marijuana Business by Christian Hageseth and Joseph D’Agnese. Thank goodness, this book was equally as interesting a read as the series was to watch and hear. As stated in the book, ¨No health organization has ever established a fatal dosage level for marijuana.¨ The author goes on to state, ¨… only a fool would argue that it is completely safe.¨ Hageseth’s company, Green Man Cannabis won the US Cannabis Cup in 2014, and being that he is devoted to his business and producing the highest quality product, he is the source I would want to learn from should I be interested in either starting a business in legal marijuana myself or investing in one.

February 9, 2015

 

 


 

A guy with a head for business gets involved in modern day marijuana growing

4.0 out of 5 stars 

This is a different sort of look at cannabis growing than other books I’ve read. Instead of ageing hippies who’ve spent time in jail and want to tell you about “back in the day” what the 60s and 70s were like smuggling dope before Nancy Reagan just said “no” and everyone wanted cocaine anyway, or maybe what the 80s and 90s were like growing their own up in Canada, this book is about growing weed starting in 2009. The author, uniquely, talks about the modern day business aspect of growing, getting permits, finding investors, vertical integration.

This is not a long book, and it started out extremely interesting so I was trying to read it slower to make it last longer. By the end I was a bit disappointed, though. The author is a bit full of himself, he drags things out a bit proselytizing about the future of legal marijuana growing, and ultimately the book seems like one big ad for his brand, with the publication meant to be timed just right to draw the masses to take tours in his new “ranches” (like a winery. Maybe…a pottery?) There is also a bit of blather about how he wanted his life to have more meaning than just making money, after talking about the ice cream shops he started and then sold and the real estate business he was in that ended badly, but it seems more like weed was just a very good business opportunity, not like he got into the business for some higher purpose.

Overall an interesting read for those who have an interest in the subject AND those who want an easy-reading business book. It could have benefited from a “suggested reading” list in the back, but if you read the “notes” section you will find some of the books the author references there.

February 9, 2015

 

 


 

I found the book easy to read with some parts being slightly long winded …

5.0 out of 5 stars 

This is a very informative book for the right person. It is a book for someone who is pro legalization and who is interested in owning a business. Anyone looking for a debate on the whether or not marijuana should be legalized and taxed should look elsewhere. This book is about Mr. Hageseth’s journey into the marijuana business and all of the complexities he faced on the way. It was very interesting to see the business aspect of this new field and to understand how much will be necessary to actually run a successful marijuana related business. I was especially intrigued by the banking aspects and did not realize how something that we take for granted would be denied you because of the type of business you’re in. I found the book easy to read with some parts being slightly long winded and too personal for the format of the book. I really could have done w/o the snippets from Mr. Hageseth, which just seemed off topic. Since I was easily able to skip his diatribes, I did not remove any stars for it.

February 7, 2015

 

 


 

A Marijuana Business Odyssey and a Lesson in Entrepreneurialism and Confusing Laws.,

4.0 out of 5 stars 

“Big Weed” tells the story of Green Man Cannabis’ struggles and success in Colorado’s legal marijuana business over the past five years. Christian Hageseth, founder of Green Man Cannabis, with co-writer Joseph D’Agnese, recounts the ups and downs, the excitement, the frustrations, successes and failures of starting a legal marijuana business in Colorado after the state legalized medical marijuana in 2000. It was an emotional as well as financial roller coaster, and Hageseth is a passionate and engaging raconteur. He takes us from the business’ conception on a golf course after Hageseth lost his job in the real estate industry, though its many rough patches -halfway through the book, he has already almost lost the business three times- its eventual success, and Hageseth’s aspirations for the future, which include the world’s first “weedery”, a $30 million tourist attraction that will house 150,000 square feet of indoor and outdoor growing space.

Green Man Cannabis was founded in 2009 as a medical marijuana grower and is now two companies. It’s not clear to me if it sells recreational marijuana at this time. The company didn’t jump into that market when recreational marijuana was legalized in Colorado in 2012. Green Man Cannabis’ web site says that they will be opening sales to recreational users this winter, though. Apparently, Red Cards, which enable “patients” to purchase medical marijuana, were always easy to obtain in Colorado and still carry some advantages over the “recreational” designation. Green Man Cannabis “started out small, inefficient, naïve, and paranoid,” as the author explains, which is why so many marijuana businesses fail in legalized markets. They can’t adapt their thinking from the small-scale illegal operations where they originated to vertically integrated legal businesses. Hageseth had an advantage there, as he was an experienced entrepreneur.

“Big Weed” is written for any interested parties but is aimed particularly at entrepreneurs, investors, marijuana lovers, and small business owners who are considering expansion and want to recognize the pitfalls. Hageseth is an enthusiastic entrepreneur and equally enthusiastic marijuana consumer. He tends to describe things in colorful terms and makes it all sound very exciting. He’s always looking to the future, so he offers us his predictions for the legal marijuana industry. Not surprisingly, he predicts a lot of consolidation and a large presence from Big Pharma and Big Agra. I’m sure there will still be artisinal growers and dispensaries, but the price of entry into the marijuana business is already a lot more than in 2000. I don’t expect a federal crackdown, as states badly need marijuana taxes, but the inability for banks to accept accounts from legal marijuana businesses due to current federal law is untenable. So legislative changes on the federal level will be necessary at some point.

February 3, 2015

 

 

 

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